Nubian Moor Race

Nubian Moor Race

Nubian Moor Women

Nubian Moor Women

Monday, April 05, 2010

The first Holocaust: Horrifying secrets of Germany's earliest genocide inside Africa's 'Forbidden Zone'





““He who asks questions, cannot avoid the answers” African Proverb

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Shem Hotep ("I go in peace").
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Read a Book,Please go to the following link.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlKL_EpnSp8
READ A BOOK, READ A BOOK. READ A MOTHER FUCKING BOOK.
I seriously wish this was played in all Black schools.

Read a Book. African Origins of the Major "Western Religions" By Yosef A. A. ben-Jochannan.
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Read a Book. African's Gift To America. By J. A. Rogers.
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Read a Book. The Story of the Moors After Spain. By Stanley Lane-Poole
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Amen Ra
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Nubian Sister, Please Hold My Hand.


Sister, please hold my hand as we journey through this land.
Together we stand, together we will fall no matter what, God will keep us together that will be the best of all.

Sister, please hold my hand because without you I can't stand
for we were put on this earth for a reason to go through every good and bad season.

Sister, please hold my hand as our strength, together, builds each other to become strong so that our love for each other will last long.


The first Holocaust: Horrifying secrets of Germany's earliest genocide inside Africa's 'Forbidden Zone'

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The Herero and Namaqua Genocide occurred in German South-West Africa (modern day Namibia) from 1904 until 1907, during the scramble for Africa. It is thought to be the first genocide of the 20th century. On January 12, 1904, the Herero people under Samuel Maharero rose in rebellion against German colonial rule, in which German settlers were also killed. In August, German general Lothar von Trotha defeated the Herero in the Battle of Waterberg and drove them into the desert of Omaheke, where most of them died of thirst. In October, the Nama also took up arms against the Germans and were dealt with in a similar fashion. In total, between 24,000 and 65,000 Herero (estimated at 50% to 70% of the total Herero population) and 10,000 Nama (50% of the total Nama population) were killed. The genocide was characterized by widespread death by starvation and from consumption of well water which had been poisoned by the Germans in the Namib Desert.
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In 1985, the United Nations' Whitaker Report recognized Germany's attempt to exterminate the Herero and Nama peoples of South-West Africa as one of the earliest attempts at genocide in the 20th century. The German government apologized for the events in 2004.

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Adrian Dietrich Lothar von Trotha (July 3, 1848 – March 31, 1920) was a German military commander universally condemned for his conduct of the Herero Wars in South-West Africa, especially for the events that led to the near-extermination of the Herero.

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Trotha's troops defeated 3,000–5,000 Herero combatants at the Battle of Waterberg on 11-12 August 1904 but were unable to encircle and eliminate the military threat.[18] The survivors retreated with their families towards Bechuanaland, after the British offered the Hereros asylum under the condition that they would not continue the revolt on British soil.

Some 24,000 Hereros managed to flee through a gap in the netting into the Kalahari Desert in the hope of reaching the British protectorate. German patrols later found skeletons around holes (25–50 feet deep) that were dug up in a vain attempt to find water. Maherero and 1,000 men crossed the Kalahari into Bechuanaland.

Lothar von TrothaOn 2 October, Trotha issued an appeal to the Hereros:

I, the great general of the German troops, send this letter to the Herero people... All Hereros must leave this land... Any Herero found within the German borders with or without a gun, with or without cattle, will be shot. I shall no longer receive any women or children; I will drive them back to their people or have them fired upon. This is my decision for the Herero people.

Unable to achieve a conclusive victory through battle, Trotha ordered that captured Herero males were to be executed, while women and children were to be driven into the desert.Leutwein complained to B├╝low about Trotha's actions, seeing the general's orders as ruining any chance of a settlement and intruding upon the civilian colonial jurisdiction. Having no authority over the military, the chancellor could only advise the Kaiser that Trotha's actions were "contrary to Christian and humanitarian principle, economically devastating and damaging to Germany's international reputation." After a political battle in Berlin between the civilian government and the military, Wilhelm II countermanded Trotha's decree of 2 October on 8 December, but the massacres had already begun. When the order was lifted at the end of 1904, prisoners were herded into concentration camps and given as slave labourers to German businesses. Many prisoners died of overwork and malnutrition.

It took until 1908 to fully re-establish German authority over the territory. At the height of the campaign, some 19,000 German troops were involved. At about the same time, diamonds were discovered in the territory, and this did much to boost its prosperity. However, it was short-lived. The German colony was taken over and occupied by the Union of South Africa in 1915, in one of the colonial campaigns of World War I. South Africa received a League of Nations Mandate over South-West Africa in 1919 under the Treaty of Versaill

Concentration camps

Survivors, mostly women and children, were eventually put in concentration camps, such as that at Shark Island, similar to those used in British South Africa during the Second Boer War. The German authorities gave each Herero a number and meticulously recorded every death, whether in the camps or from forced labor, even including the name of each dead person in their reports. German enterprises were able to rent Hereros in order to use their manpower, and workers' deaths were permitted and even reported to the German authorities. Forced labour, disease, and malnutrition killed an estimated 50–80% of the entire Herero population by 1908, when the camps were closed.

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Samuel Maharero (1856-1923) was a chief of the Herero people in German South-West Africa (today Namibia) during their revolts and in connection with the events surrounding the Herero genocide.

Please go to the following link for Herero genocide.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXgIhSjWGhE&feature=related